Home
 

William "Dr. Rev." & Susan "Molly" (Lewis) Rogers

William (Dr. Rev.) Rogers

Born: 4 Feb 1777 in Montgomery County (later Wythe County), Virginia
Died:
6 Jun 1836 in Speedwell, Claiborne, County, Tennessee
Burial:
Shutter's Cemetery, Speedwell, Claiborne County, Tennessee
Replacement headstone of William Rogers and his wife Susan (Molly) Lewis
Please note the comments in paragraph 6 of the email below from Ray dated 21 Feb 2000 reference William's wife's first name

Mother: ? Britton
Father: John Rogers

She was living with dau Dicey M. and husband in the Claiborne Co 1850 census.

Married: Susan (Molly) Lewis 1796

Born: 1 Jan 1781 in Surry County/Guilford County, North Carolina
Died:
1853 in Speedwell, Claiborne, County, Tennessee
Burial:
Shutter's Cemetery, Speedwell, Claiborne County, Tennessee

Mother: Unknown ( Catherine Moon-step mother)
Father: Solomon Lewis

Children:

  1. Elizabeth
    b. Abt. 1796, Tennessee
    d. 1863
  2. David William
    b. 1799
    d. 1883
  3. Nancy
    b. Aug 1802 in Claiborne County, Tennessee
    m. John Carr
    d. May 1863 in Livingston County, Missouri
  4. Lewis Jackson
    b. 24 Oct 1803, Speedwell, Claiborne County, Tennessee
    d. 7 Dec 1901, Clinton County, Missouri
  5. Sarah (Sallie)
    b. 8 Mar 1805
    d. 6 Oct 1843
    m. James Cannon (McCubbins) Carr
  6. Deliah
    b. 1806
    d. Aft. 1870
  7. Susan
    b. 12 Jul 1809, Campbell County, Tennessee
    m. Elisha McNew d. 19 May 1880, Buried Stout-Dosset, Campbell County, Tennessee
  8. Mary (Polly) Katherine
    b. Abt. 1811
  9. William Fletcher
    b. Abt. 1815
    d. 1871, Jefferson County, Kansas
  10. Hester Ann
    b. 1815
  11. Dicey Minerva
    b. Abt. 1819
    d. Abt. 1850
  12. James (Dr. James) Asbury
    b. 1821
    d. 1860
 

Sources and Additional Information:

Posted 16 Sept 08

This article is of of course in reference to Rev. Dr. William Rogers b. 1777 who was the oldest child of John "the Powder Maker" Rogers b. 1757:

Tennessee newspaper extracts and abstracts - The Knoxville Press 1816 - 1830 by
PollyAnna Creekmore
The Knoxville Enquirer - 1827 Volume 3 - page 209 number 156
Doctor William Rogers will practice Medicine, Surgery, &c, in the counties of Claiborne and Campbell, Tenn. He can be found at his shop in Bolingreen, near Speedwell, Powells Valley.:

The last article is a marriage performed by Rev. Dr. William Rogers. I have not identified the bride or the mother. If any of you have an ideas, please let us know. This does of course indicate that Rev. Dr. Wm. Rogers was in fact still performing marriages even after he began practicing medicine.

Tennessee newspaper extracts and abstracts - The Knoxville Press 1816 - 1830 by
PollyAnna Creekmore
1829 Volume 14 - page 144 number 689
Oct. 28, married on Wednesday evening, 21st inst., by the Rev. Dr. William Rogers, Elijah Shelter to Miss Betsey Munday, daughter of Mrs. Polly Munday, all of Claiborne County.

The History of Tazewell Methodist Church is rooted in the historic visit of Bishop Asbury in 1802, when many early citizens of Claiborne County were converted to Methodism. Asbury speaks in his journal of preaching "at Hunt's at Claiborne Courthouse", on October 14, 1802, at which date there were 2,767 white member of the Methodist Church in the State of Tennessee, and 180 black members. By the year 1803, the number of Methodists within the State had grown to 3,560 white members, and 248 black members.

The Methodist Church in Claiborne County became popular, and gained a strong following at a very early date. We find, in the records of Big Springs Baptist Church, that on April 2nd Saturday 1804: "In consequence of a report of Sister Elizabeth Campbell's joining the Methodist Society, we send our Sisters, Sarah Henderson and Hannah Neal, to inquire into the matter of the case. On May 2nd Saturday 1804: "Elizabeth Campbell excommunicated for neglecting to attend her meeting, and for joining another society". By 1812, the Holston District of the Methodist Church contained 4,365 white members, and 327 black members.

At what time the Methodist Congregation at Tazewell was formally organized is uncertain, however, the early Church worshiped at the large framed Presbyterian Church, built by William Graham, Willis Hayes and others, in 1815. Among the early Pastors of the Methodist Church, who preached at the old Presbyterian Church were Rev's Charles MaAnally, William Burgess and William Rogers.

Note: William (Preacher Bill) was also one of the first Justices of the Peace when Claiborne County, Tennessee was formed in 1801.

Thema: Some Pioneer Teachers & Preachers
Datum: 02/01/2000 7:28:21 PM GMT Standard Time
From: carob@tc3net.com (Thomas Woodward)
To: JRogers722@aol.com

Hi , Don't know if you have seen these , but thought I would pass it on.

Carol

Churches, Chapels and Preachers

Cawood Methodist Church, Claiborne County, Speedwell area, was established in 1800. The land was given by Wm. Bowman. It was located one-half mile northeast of the present location. About 1853 the church split due to a misunderstanding, the Rogers and the Cawoods, being related, on one side, and the Bowmans and their friends on the other side. The church was abandoned: Wiley Huffaker bought the logs and built a barn.

In 1853 Stephen Cawood gave a plot of ground for a new church which was erected. From then on it was called Cawood Methodist. During the strife between the states, this building served at different times as a lodging for Confederate and Federal troops. After the war it continued as a church and school. Later the school was combined with the Speedwell Male Academy.

Academies, Institutes, Schools, Colleges, and Preachers, and Teachers Speedwell Male Academy, Claiborne County. This school was erected in 1827 by George Shetter, a German from Pennsylvania. He came into the valley around 1820. He was an expert at building houses or anything else. His old ledger books written in German were in the possession of the Rogers family. The Shetters were childless. He built this academy out of the reddest brick which he made himself on the spot. The woodwork was hand worked. There was a high tower and weather vane on the school. It consisted of two rooms down and two up. The school had the best teachers available. Two early teachers were a Mr. Stout and a Mr. Bratcher. Later, Stephen Rogers and Joseph McMahan were teachers there. This academy was equal to a college. George Shetter died in February, 1840. He left 114 acres to the school.

Major David Rogers was the administrator of the estate. This school continued to operate and was later taken over by the county. It still stands in bad repair, with windows broken. It was men like Shetter who cared enough to use their own gifts to give unto others without thought of compensation except they were doing what they felt was their duty. These were the unsung heroes of our early years.

Rogers, William. Early Methodist minister of Claiborne County, Tennessee. He was also a medical doctor. He was the son of John Rogers, Revolutionary soldier. His wife was Catherine Lewis, daughter of Solomon Lewis and Catherine Moon Lewis. It was at Knoxville that Dr. Rogers and his wife came to hear Bishop Asbury hold a series of meetings for three days. Rogers was so impressed that he told his wife, "Catherine, what would you say if I told you that I was going to be a preacher?" She said, "Lord, see that you may!" He was licensed as a local preacher and became well known as a camp meeting preacher. They were the parents of several children, and have many descendants in the area of Speedwell, Tennessee.

The book, Some Pioneer Preachers and Teachers of Tennessee was published in 1974. It was compiled by Rosalie Ausmus Keever. This publication is a bicentennial project of the Tennessee Society, NSDAR.

Thema: William Rogers occupation
Datum: 02/21/2000 5:45:51 AM GMT Standard Time
Von: SWDLookN

Cousins,

I think I have compiled enough documentation to prove once and for all the occupation of William Rogers, first son of John (the Powder Maker) Rogers.

In the early 1960's, my great aunt, Ruth Rogers Willets sat down at her kitchen table and recorded her memories of growing up on a farm in eastern Kansas at the beginning of the last century. Her parents also told her stories about their life and that of her grandparents. She published her book, A grandmother's Memories, in 1965. It was this book that started me on my quest to find all I can about my forefathers.

After reviewing all the information I have gathered, I believe you will agree that William Rogers (1777-1836) was both a Doctor and a Methodist Minister.

1. In A Grandmother's Memories, page 20, Aunt Ruth wrote "My parental grandfather, William Fletcher Rogers, received his education in Tennessee, so it is also possible that he was born in the state of Tennessee. His father was a Methodist minister and a Doctor".

2. Claiborne County TN, Land & Property Deed Book U, page 515, lists all of William Rogers children. They are listed in order of their birth and it also lists who his daughters married. On page 517, the following is written; "The above conveys the interest of several heirs in the said tracts of land which descended to Dr. William Rogers".

3. Claiborne County TN, Land & Property Deed Book S, page 325, contains William F. Rogers power of attorney to John Kincaid. He authorized Kincaid to convey all of his interest in the lands owned by doctor William Rogers and R. B. Rogers.

4. Claiborne County TN, Land & Property Deed Book U, page 498, describes all of the tracts of land to be conveyed to Elisha McNew by William F. Rogers. It states in part; "my share of said tracts of land as one of the heirs at law of Doctor Wm. Rogers decd.; being the undivided twelfth part of half of said tracts, which half formerly belonged to Doctor Wm. Rogers Decd.

5. Obituary from the Lathrop, Clinton Co. Missouri, Herald, Dec 12, 1901. Lewis Jackson Rogers. "His father was a minister in the M. E. church in Tennessee and an intimate friend of Gen. Jackson."

6. Type written copy of John Weir's family Bible. (John Weir was William Fletcher Rogers father-in-law.) The family record states that Mary Issabella Grills Weir, fourth daughter of John and Dicy C. Weir was married to William F. Rogers, son of Doct. Wm. and Susan Rogers, Sept 2nd 1840.

This last item, #6, brings up another problem with the Rogers research in Claiborne Co. TN, namely Stephen H. Rogers and his uncle Lewis Moon Rogers. In all the books written about the Rogers before the 1940's, Dr.William Rogers wife is called Molly or Polly's sister or Solomon Lewis's daughter, never by her given name. When they decided to replace the head stones for John (the Powder Maker) Rogers, Dr. William Rogers and his wife, they must have decided that Susan Lewis was named after her mother. Not knowing that Catherine Moon Lewis was her step-mother and NOT the natural mother of Susan, they had the name Catherine engraved on the head stone. The stone also list's William Rogers death occurring in 1853 not 1836.

#7. 1850 Federal Census, pub. #M432-874, Page 329, Claiborne Co. TN,.Susan (Lewis) Rogers is listed in the household of her son-in-law.

Clinton Y. Rice, age 30, Farmer
Dicy M. , age 31
James F. , age 2
Susan Rogers , age 68
James A. Rogers, age 30, Physician

I hope this clears up three things; the occupation of William Rogers, the given name of his wife, and the year he died.

Jerry, I think you were correct in advising our cousins not to use the suffix MD with Dr. William Rogers. I believe that in order to use MD in the early 1800's, one would have had to attend a school of higher learning. Our family tradition says that he had a fine library and read nightly. He also made sure his children received an education.

I think you could be anything you wanted to be back then. If you were literate and studied medical books and had some knowledge of herbal medicine, you could hang out a shingle and become a doctor. If you studied the Bible and thought you could preach, you could start you own church in the parlor.

I believe there were three or more William Rogers in Claiborne Co. in the early 1800's, our William who lived in Powell Valley; William, the Indian, who lived on Bald Creek; and William, who lived in the town of Tazwell. Does anyone know which one was Recorder of Deeds?

PS, Lets not call William Rogers Preacher Bill from now on. A more appropriate way of identifying him would be Dr. William Rogers M.G. or Rev. Dr. William Rogers.

Ray

Dr. Rev William Rogers b. 4 Feb 1777, son of John the Powder Maker, ................page 58 of "Some Pioneer Preachers and Teachers of Tennessee", 1974 by Rosalie Ausmus Keever.

"Rogers, William. Early Methodist minister of Claiborne County. He was also a medical doctor. He was the son of John Rogers, Revolutionary soldier. His wife was Catherine Lewis, daughter of Solomon Lewis and Catherine Moon Lewis.

It was at Knoxville that Dr. Rogers and his wife came to hear Bishop Asbury hold a series of meetings for three days. Rogers was so impressed that he told his wife, "Catherine, what would you say if I told you that I was going to be a preacher." She said, "Lord see that you may!" He was licensed as a local preacher and became well known as a camp meeting preacher.

They were parents of several children, and have many descendants in the area of Speedwell, Tennessee." .................and many other places, if I may add that.

1.1.1a.2 William M. D. ROGERS Rev.
Birth: 4 Feb 1777, Native Of Powell Valley, Claiborne Co., TN
Res: Pg. 5, 50, 135
Death: 6 Jun 1836, Speedwell, Claiborne Co., TN
Burial: Shutters Cemetery, Speedwell, Claiborne Co., TN
Occ: Postmaster Appointed 1-10-1818 & 10-19-1836; Minister; Dr.
Source: P. G. Fulkerson Papers
Reli: Methodist Minister Of Powell Valley, Claiborne Co., TN

The children of Rev. Dr. William Rogers settled his estate in Jan. 1851 byselling his property. This Deed was recorded in Land & Property Deed Book U,page 515. Indexed: Elisha McNew & others ------ Deed to J. A. Rogers & C. Y.Rice.

Copyright 1999 - 2012
by Jerry Rogers and contributors to this site. All rights reserved. This information may be used by libraries, genealogical societies, and for personal use, however, commercial use of this information is strictly prohibited without prior permission of the owners. Stories, photos and records cannot be copied and reposted on any other website without permission. You may link to these pages.